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Fall Annual Meeting & Symposium Schedule

Vancouver, British Columbia

Vancouver Convention Center

 

OSchedule

OCTOBER 20, 2017

Friday Night Special Event - :Vancouver General Hospital, 899 W 12th Ave, Vancouver, BC,Diamond Centre Auditorium

18:00

 

- 6:00 pm: start time

- 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm: Dr. McKinney (Master Athletes), Dr. Desplantie (Sleep and the Cardiovascular System)

- Light heart healthy meal followed by a tour of VGH

 

OCTOBER 21, 2017

08:00 – 09:00 Room 223-224

Plenary

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE AIR QUALITY AND EXERCISE IN PERSONS LIVING WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE ADVANCED LEARNING
MODULE


Darren Warburton
Vancouver, BC
Jennifer Harris
Ottawa, ON
Alan Abelsohn
Toronto, ON
Shannon Bredin
Vancouver, BC

11:00 – 12:00 Room 220/221/222

Plenary

TERRY KAVANAGH LECTURE – Patients and Cardiac Rehabilitation: Why We Care

Moderator(s):

Jennifer Reed, PhD, R.Kin

James Stone, MD, FRCPC

Calgary, AB

University of Calgary

Objectives:

  • To better understand the evidence supporting clinical efficacy and cardiac rehabilitation
  • To better understand the importance of caring for patients in the process of patient care
  • To better understand why shared care is better care

Summary: The clinical efficacy of cardiac rehabilitation has been demonstrated repeatedly and consistently over decades.  Randomized clinical trails, meta-analyses, cohort studies, and the analysis of large databases have consistently demonstrated cost-effective improvements in clinical outcomes and the reduced utilization of acute care resources.  Within that process of care, one of the constants has been the importance of engaging patients in their own chronic disease care through our demonstrated concern for their well-being and for their physical and mental health. The unique clinical practice environment of cardiac rehabilitation which employs interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary shared care has been critical to the achievement of better care for our patients.  This presentation will highlight these areas and hopefully empower the listener to better engage patients and fellow practitioners in chronic disease care management and cardiovascular rehabilitation.

12:00 – 13:30 Room 223/224

CACPR - Annual General Meeting

Boxed lunch only provided if ordered on CCC registration website.

Oral Presentations:

13:30 – 14:30 Room 220/221/222

HIBERNATE NO MORE!

Moderator(s):

Evyanne Wooding, RKin

13:30 - THE IMPACT OF PREHABILITATION ON FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR PATIENTS AWAITING CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT SURGERY AND/OR MITRAL VALVE SURGERY

A Van Damme, CM Norris, DM Buijs, C Black, K Penney, GT Gyenes

Edmonton, AB

13:45 - CARDIORESPIRATORY EFFECTS AND MODIFICATIONS TO CARDIAC REHABILITATION FOR NON-CARDIAC CHRONIC DISEASE POPULATIONS: A SCOPING REVIEW

CH Nguyen, SG Thomas

Toronto, ON

14:00 - ASSOCIATION OF STATIN MEDICATION WITH EXERCISE CAPACITY CHANGE IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION: A RETROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY

EU Mohammad, P Prior, T Hartley, N Suskin

London, ON

14:15 - EVALUATING SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE TESTS AS MEASURES OF FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY IN CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION SETTINGS

JL Reed, LM Cotie, CA Cole, JM Harris, BP Moran, AL Pipe

Ottawa, ON

14:20 - THE RESULTS OF MAXIMAL AND SUBMAXIMAL FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY TESTS IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION SETTINGS: UNDERSTANDING SEX DIFFERENCES

LM Cotie, CA Cole, AL Pipe, JL Reed

Ottawa, ON

14:25 - THE IMPACT OF CARDIAC REHABILITATION ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN INDIVIDUALS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

S Heinze-Milne, A Zahavich, V Bakowsky, N Giacomantonio, S Grandy

Halifax, NS

Workshops:

14:30 - 15:30 Room 204

HEALTH E-UNIVERSITY - A VIRTUAL PATIENT EDUCATION INSTITUTE TO IMPROVE HEALTH LITERACY AND SELF-MANAGEMENT IN PEOPLE LIVING WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIABETES

Crystal Aultman, MSc, OCT, RKin

Nicole Sandison, MSc, RKin

Lauren Jenkinson, BSc

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the process to develop a structured patient education program and identify the tools available to assess needs and evaluate effectiveness
  • Identify how Cardiac College and Diabetes College can be used to improve health literacy and self‐ management in their program
  • Navigate Cardiac College and Diabetes College to access resources such as resistance training and nutrition videos

Summary: Patient education is a core component of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation and diabetes programming and can lead to improved health literacy, increased knowledge, changes in health behaviours, and ultimately decreased morbidity and mortality. Studies indicate that while cardiac rehabilitation is effective, a number of barriers prevent patients from engaging in these programs. With the widespread use of the internet, both in Canada and internationally, online patient education initiatives hold the potential to expand reach, and improve health outcomes for patients within and outside of structured programming. This workshop describes the development of Health e‐ University – a virtual patient education institute that includes colleges focused on the treatment and management of specific chronic diseases, namely Cardiac College (www.cardiaccollege.ca) and the Sun Life Financial Diabetes College (www.diabetescollege.ca). Participants in this workshop will n about the process used to develop a patient‐centered curriculum, with an emphasis on patient involvement and consideration of patients’ needs and demographics that include health literacy, medical status, and time point in recovery. Participants will also explore the tools used to evaluate the effectiveness of the colleges, tour the multimedia assets, participate in a resistance training demonstration, and engage in a discussion about collaborative use, dissemination, and evaluation.

14:30 – 15:30 Room 205

How to improve the rigor and impact of behavioural clinical trials: Work from the International Behavioural Trials Network

Simon L. Bacon, PhD, FTOS, FCCS

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

1) Describe the steps in appropriately developing a behavioural intervention

2) Detail when and how best to test a behavioural intervention once it is developed

3) Critique the current literature in terms of the development and testing of the behavioural intervention

Summary: There is rapidly growing, robust literature demonstrating that good health behaviors (e.g., eating a healthy diet, engaging in regular physical activity, refraining from smoking or smoking cessation) are associated with a reduction in mortality and chronic non-communicable disease prevalence. However, despite the great potential benefits of health behavior interventions, the uptake and impact of existing behavioral interventions and the creation of new promising interventions has generally been limited by a variety of methodological challenges specific to the design and conduct of behavioral clinical trials. The International Behavioural Trials Network was created to address methodological issues unique to these trials and provide guidance on current ‘best practices’ in the development and implementation of behavioral trials. This session will highlight some of the key issues that are unique to behavioral trials, detail novel approaches to resolve these issues, and discuss some of the areas where further work is needed. Given the increased number of behavioral interventions and trials appearing in the literatureand growing interest in these kinds of studies for more classically trained trial methodologists, this session will provide both theoretical and practical information that will be useful for both experienced, as well as, junior behavioural trialists.

14:30 – 15:30 Room 206

CARDIAC PREHAB: PREPARING PATIENTS FOR ELECTIVE CARDIAC SURGERY

Regan Kiefer, PT

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Kathryn Caldwell, RN, BNSc

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Kathleen Turner, RD

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify areas where gaps exist in pre-operative cardiac care
  • Identify ways in which cardiac rehabilitation may address some of these gaps in various settings
  • Understand the process and material included in the UOHI Cardiac Prehabilitation (Prehab) program

Summary: Roughly 1500 patients undergo elective cardiac surgery at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) every year, and often the wait can be quite long for their procedures. Overall anxiety associated with their health & impending surgery can cause many patients to neglect any heart healthy behaviours and may ultimately negatively impact their risk factor profile during this waiting period. Last year the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the UOHI questioned how our patients awaiting elective coronary bypass or valve surgery could begin improving their health before their procedure. Could a pre-operative cardiac rehab intervention systematically improve patients’ risk factor profiles and/or post-operative outcomes? Following this brief introduction, this workshop will have participants break into 5 or 6 small groups to discuss pre-operative concerns in their settings and how they may impact post-operative outcomes. Issues such as patient de-conditioning, increased stress and anxiety, uncontrolled diabetes, poor medication management and adherence, as well as malnutrition are some topics we expect to hear discussed when we reconvene as a larger group. We will then have a second breakout time to brainstorm on barriers and solutions to some of these problems, specific to each region, taking into account the resources they may or may not have available. It will be important to ensure groupings change at this point, in order to have participants working with other professionals who come from similarly resourced facilities. Examples of barriers may include access to space or a multidisciplinary team. Finally, coming back together as a larger group to examine the proposed ideas, we will present the Cardiac Prehab program launched at our facility in December of 2016, and demonstrate how we have responded to many of these gaps for our patients awaiting elective cardiac surgery. Rather than letting the waiting period be one of inactivity and anxiety, Prehab is helping our patients use that time to become as ready as possible for their surgery.

14:30 – 15:30 Room 207

FROM BENCH TO BEDSIDE AND BEYOND: THE OTTAWA MODEL FOR SMOKING CESSATION STORY  


Andrew Pipe, CM, BA, MD, LLD(Hons), DSc(Hons)

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Debbie Aitken, RN

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Mustafa Coja, MSc

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Allana LeBlanc, PhD

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Kerri-Anne Mullen, PhD

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Robert Reid, PhD, MBA

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of smoking cessation in cardiac patients
  • Identify how they could implement the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation in their practice
  • Agree on priorities in smoking cessation research

Summary: Smoking is a fundamental risk factor for many chronic, non-communicable diseases and acknowledged as a leading cause of preventable death worldwide. Quitting smoking is the single most effective thing an individual can do to improve their health. The Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a systematic, comprehensive approach to clinical tobacco dependence treatment developed by smoking cessation experts and facilitators. The mission of OMSC is to assist healthcare organizations and health professionals to transform clinical practices appropriate to the treatment of smokers through knowledge translation, implementation support, and quality evaluation. The OMSC aims to assist large numbers of tobacco users by ensuring the provision of effective, evidence-based tobacco-dependence treatment, delivered by knowledgeable healthcare professionals. This workshop is aimed at practitioners and health care providers to share the story of how OMSC was developed, and how it will continue to grow moving forward. The first part of the workshop will provide participants with the background information they need. Specifically, we will focus on the importance of smoking cessation in cardiac patients (10 min); introduce the Ottawa Model for Smoking Cessation and highlight some of the successes it has had (10 min); and discuss program improvement initiatives, implementation, and future directions (10 min). The second part of the workshop will be highly interactive and largely guided by the audience. It will be focused around a panel and audience discussion to identify priorities for smoking cessation research (30 min).

16:00 – 17:00 Room 204

IMPLEMENTING TELEHEALTH-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION PROGRAMS: INSIGHTS FROM THE VIRTUAL CARDIAC REHABILITATION PROGRAM (VCRP)

  Scott Lear, PhD

Vancouver, BC

Simon Fraser University

Monika Tsia, BSc

Surrey, BC

Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention Program, Fraser Health

Moderator:

Tracey Colella, RN, PhD

Univeristy of Toronto

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of this program, participants will be able to understand the current challenges for patients unable to access traditional cardiac rehabilitation and how technology can help address these gaps.
  • At the end of this program, participants will be able to understand what the virtual cardiac rehabilitation program is and how it works from the point of view of patients, providers and researchers.
  • At the end of this program, participants will be able to identify potential challenges and benefits to implementing telehealth‐based cardiac rehabilitation program in their own organization or practice setting.
  • At the end of this program, participants will be able to grasp the key elements and the lessons learned in implementing a research intervention into healthcare practice.

Summary: Cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRPs) are proven to prevent premature death and cardiac events, however, as little as 20‐30% of eligible patients attend. In 2014/15, Fraser Health (FH) reported over 13,000 cardiac events but had less than 1,300 CRP spots. As a result, FH patients with CVD were highly underserviced. To address this gap, members of FH Cardiac Services partnered with SFU researcher, Dr. Scott Lear who had developed and tested a ‘virtual’ CRP. The vCRP is an evidence‐based, patient‐centred 12‐week program consisting of a website for data, resource and message exchange, remote heart‐rate monitoring and televisits with healthcare professionals. Working with FH, the vCRP integrates with existing CRP referral processes; just one way the research based vCRP has been modified to meet the specific needs of the healthcare setting. The multi‐disciplinary led workshop will introduce participants to the experience of implementing the vCRP in two FH hospitals as a blueprint to apply to their own organizations. Presenters will share successes and challenges to help participants mobilize similar programs. Break‐out sessions and group discussions will guide participants through an assessment of the gaps in their current services and potential barriers and facilitators to implementing their own virtual program. With insights about the program from the researcher/developer, vCRP exercise specialist and patient, participants will gain an in‐depth understanding of the program and the key elements of successful implementation. General themes of using technology to address patient care access gaps, the patient ‘virtual’ journey and translating research interventions into healthcare practice will also be explored.

16:00 – 17:00 Room 205

HEALING HEARTS TOGETHER: MEETING THE NEEDS OF CARDIAC COUPLES

Heather Tulloch, PhD, C. Psych

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Paul Greenman, PhD, C. Psych

Ottawa, ON

Universite de Quebec en Outaouais


Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the challenges faced by cardiac couples
  • Describe a new framework to understand the couples’ reactions to a cardiac event
  • Describe key conversations to assist cardiac couples to connect and better manage heart disease

Summary: The impact of a cardiac event is felt by the patient and the partner. In fact, partners often experience distress at equal or greater levels than the patient. Evidence also suggests that support from the partner and positive coping within the dyad may have a profound impact on recovery from a cardiac event. Yet, the partner is often not included in cardiac rehabilitation. This workshop will first describe the impact that cardiac disease has on couple relationships. We will highlight common areas of distress/conflict among cardiac couples as well as the challenges that they face (e.g., difficulty adjusting to lifestyle changes, medication management, loss of identity); participants will also share their experience and observations working with cardiac couples. As the couples’ reaction is a reflection of their interpersonal style, the couple relationship pre‐event, and health history, we will then discuss a framework to better understand the couples’ reaction post‐cardiac event. Next, we will describe research highlighting the benefits of couples‐based interventions for cardiac patients. Finally, we will describe the Healing Hearts Together program, a relationship enhancement and education program for cardiac patients and their partners. The goal of the program is to improve relationship quality, the management of disease, and quality of life. Participants will experience parts of  the intervention (i.e., key conversations) through small group discussion and exercises in pairs. There will be opportunities for questions and discussion throughout the workshop; time will also be reserved at the end.

16:00 – 17:00 Room 206

FUNCTIONAL FITNESS ASSESSMENT IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION

  Lisa Cotie, PhD, RKin

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Evyanne Wooding, RKin

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Learning Objectives:

  • Objective behind the Senior Fitness Test (SFT), Chester Step Test, 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT)
  • Learn how to conduct the SFT, Chester Step Test and 6MWT
  • Challenges that may arise while conducting these tests

Summary: Quality of life, especially in the later years, largely depends on one’s independence. The ability to continue to participate in activities of daily living is necessary to maintain independence. With the rapid growth of the aging population this has become of great importance to help relieve the burden on the health care system. I am proposing to lead a workshop which will focus on functional fitness testing, including the Senior Fitness Test, Chester Step Test and 6-minute walk test, as functional fitness tests appropriate for administration in cardiac rehabilitation programs. The workshop will begin with a short introduction of the functional fitness tests (SFT, Chester Step Test and 6MWT), including the objectives, protocols and contraindications to each test. Stations will be set-up with the necessary equipment and attendees will break into smaller groups and practice. Everyone will have the opportunity to be the tester and the ‘patient’. Each group will be given a case study which includes a challenge/contraindication for one of the tests. In the small groups the case studies will be ‘solved’ and then presented to the whole group. The session will finish with a round of Jeopardy, focusing on the protocols, contraindications, activities of daily living, equipment and measurement specificity. By the end of the workshop, individuals will be able to describe the purpose of each of the tests, list the activities of daily living, understand the contraindications and challenges for each test and confidently conduct the tests.

16:00 – 17:00 Room 207

A TICKING TIME BOMB: CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH IN MEN ON ANDROGEN DEPRIVATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

Kristin Campbell, BSc, PT, PhD

Vancouver, BC

University of British Columbia

Sarah Weller, ACSM, CEP

Vancouver, BC

Vancouver Prostate Centre

Jennifer Edgecombe, ACSM, CCEP, CET

Kamloops, BC

City of Kamloops. Parks and Recreation

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the side effects that men treated with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer commonly experience and how these factors implicate cardiovascular health.
  • Identify key considerations needed for exercise prescription in men on androgen deprivation therapy to ensure safety and to improve cardiovascular health.
  • Apply training principles to design evidence-based exercise programs to address the needs of men on androgen deprivation therapy within a cardiac rehabilitation setting.

Summary: This workshop will use an evidence-based approach to clinical exercise programming to provide the audience with an understanding of key considerations for working with men with prostate cancer, a clinical population that is growing in number and will become increasing relevant as participants of cardiac rehabilitation programming.

 

Sunday October 22, 2017

09:00 – 10:00 Room 220

Plenary

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

Moderator(s):

Shauna Ratner, RD

Kathleen Turner, RD

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

 

10:00 – 10:30 PANEL “Quality in cardiac rehabilitation: the role of a national registry in driving quality care for our patients.

CCRR Executive Committee

 

10:45 – 11:45 Room 220

Oral

Oral Abstracts

Moderator(s):

Paul Oh, MD

10:45 - RESULTS FROM A RANDOMIZED FEASIBILITY TRIAL OF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING TO PROMOTE PARTICIPATION IN OUTPATIENT CARDIAC REHABILITATION

CR Rouleau, KM King-Shier, LM Tomfohr-Madsen, SL Bacon, S Aggarwal, T Hauer, R Arena, TS Campbell

Calgary, AB

11:00 - A PRELIMINARY MIXED-METHODS STUDY OF BARRIERS TO FOLLOW-UP CARE AMONG CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE PATIENTS AFTER COMPLETION OF OUTPATIENT CARDIAC REHABILITATION

J Giannoccaro, C Rouleau, TS Campbell, R Arena, SL Grace, D Aggarwal, S Aggarwal

Calgary, AB

11:15 - BEHAVIOURAL MODIFICATION IN CARDIAC REHABILITATION: AN INTERPROFESSIONAL HYBRID COUNSELLING APPROACH TO NUTRITIONAL OUTCOMES

D Hopkins-Rosseel, M Shalchi, K Thomas, K Hemmens, C Massé, R Taylor, J Tilley, W Hopman

Kingston, ON

11:30 - LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM IN THE WORKPLACE

J Schwartz, P Oh, BC Hansen, BA Hives, EJ Buckler, T Giallonardo, K Kaufman, A Lasinsky, MS Rice, A Jeklin, LE Meanwell, DER Warburton   

Vancouver, BC

11:35 - CHARACTERIZING THOSE WITH AND WITHOUT SUICIDAL IDEATION: DATA FROM THE FLEX SMOKING CESSATION TRIALA Byron-Alhassan, A Heenan, AL Pipe, C Els, MJ Clyde, RD Reid, HE Tulloch

Ottawa, ON

11:40 - THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PATIENT-CENTERED EDUCATION FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS OF PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

H Kim, HJ Kim, EE Suh

Seoul, Republic of Korea

 

11:45 – 12:30 Room 220

Plenary

HIIT MASTER CLASS

  Moderator(s):

Paul Oh, MD

Jennifer Reed, PhD, R.Kin

Ottawa, ON

University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Rob Bertelink, R.Kin, B.PHE

Toronto, ON

UHN – Toronto Rehabilitation Institute


Learning Objectives: To provide a master class on high-interval interval training (HIIT) for cardiac rehabilitation clinicians and researchers.

Summary: This HIIT master class will: (1) review the evidence for HIIT in cardiac rehabilitation; (2) describe various HIIT protocols; (3) discuss how to set-up and conduct individualized HIIT protocols; (4) review contraindications for HIIT; and, (5) provide HIIT demonstrations with patients with cardiovascular disease.

14:00-15:00 – Room 220

E-CIGARETTE DEBATE – “WHICH SIDE OF THE LIGHT ARE YOU ON?”

Andrew Pipe, MD, University of Ottawa Heart Institute

Simon Bacon, PhD, Concordia University

Moderator: Robert Reid, PhD, University of Ottawa Heart Institute

 

15:00 – 15:30 - Room 220

CACPR Closing Ceremonies

Tracy Selway, CACPR President

Moncton, NB

Tracey Colella, PhD, Nursing

Toronto, ON

UHN- Toronto Rehabilitation Institute

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